Provincial names and folk lore of British birds

by C. A. Swainson

Publisher: Published the English Dialect Society by Trübner in London

Written in English
Cover of: Provincial names and folk lore of British birds | C. A. Swainson
Published: Pages: 243 Downloads: 318
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Subjects:

  • Birds -- Folklore,
  • Birds -- Nomenclature (Popular),
  • Birds -- Great Britain

Edition Notes

Statementpublished in conjunction with the Folk Lore Society.
GenreFolklore, Nomenclature (Popular)
Series[Publications] / English Dialect Society -- v. 18, Publications (English Dialect Society) -- v. 18
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQL677 S83
The Physical Object
Pagination243p.
Number of Pages243
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23327880M

Once I realised I was going to be spending three books with magical hares, I began to research the role of hares in traditional tales. Though I only scratched the surface, like a hare scratching a form in a field, rather than a rabbit digging a deep burrow, I was amazed at the widespread, varied nature of hare folklore and mythology.   British dragon-tales, about saints and knights who vanquish them with the help of God or sharp swords; about clever peasants who eliminate dragons through cunning; and the many dragons who still live hidden in our hills, have been collected by the well-known folklorist Jacqueline Simpson in her book British Dragons (). Birds and Creation Myths from several regions associate birds with the creation of the world. One of several creation stories in ancient Egypt said that when land rose out of the primeval waters of chaos, the first deity to appear was a bird perching on that land. The Egyptians called the god the Benu bird and portrayed it as a long-legged, wading heron in the sun temple at Heliopolis. Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library.

Fairy tales are stories that range from those originating in folklore to more modern stories defined as literary fairy tales. Despite subtle differences in the categorizing of fairy tales, folklore, fables, myths, and legends, a modern definition of the fairy tale, as provided by Jens Tismar's monologue in German, is a story that differs "from an oral folk tale", written by "a single. We people are now so removed (in our heads) from wildlife that most British people would be hard-pressed to describe what a Nightingale looks like, or a Cuckoo. Yet there was a time when ordinary, hard-working folk had names for each and every plant and animal around them – names which were different county-to-county and even between villages. Most countries select official symbolic birds to be a part of their national culture, and many countries go even further and each individual state or province selects a bird for its own symbol. While Canada has no official national bird, each province and territory does have a designated bird that is often used for ceremonies, emblems, and other official symbolism. A vision of pastoralism and harmony with nature, derived from the Greek province of the same name which dates to antiquity. Asgard: The high placed city of the gods, built by Odin, chief god of the Norse pantheon. Asphodel Meadows: In Greek mythology, the section of the underworld where ordinary souls were sent to live after death. Atlantis.

All of the British deities listed here come from Romano-Celtic pantheon. The deities found here belong to the period when Britain was a province of Rome Empire. Like the page on the Gallic Deities, these Celtic deities were sometimes adopted by the Romans, who lived . "A list of the birds of British Columbia was written by John Fan&, Curator of the Provincial Museum, Victoria, about The senior author of the present publication recalls having had it submitted to him by Fannin for corrections and additions. Fannin's "Check-List, of British Columbia Birds. Birds of British Columbia Specialties. species in 46 families. Provincial Bird Steller’s Jay. (name of the species, location and owner of the picture) Any kind of resident waterfowl (ducks/geese) in clutch I wish we had stopped to take a picture because I have been unable to identify the birds from any books or websites. Any.   This list of the birds of Britain contains pictures and facts on a number of well-known British species. This page is the second part of our look at birds of the British Isles. You can find the first part here: Common British Birds. In the list below you’ll find species that aren’t quite as common or as well-known as those in the first list.

Provincial names and folk lore of British birds by C. A. Swainson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Provincial names and folk lore of British birds Item Preview Provincial names and folk lore of British birds by Swainson, Charles. Publication date Topics Digitizing sponsor Google Book from the collections of Oxford University Language English Volume Book digitized by Google from the library of Oxford University and uploaded Pages:   Buy The Folk Lore and Provincial Names of British Birds on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders The Folk Lore and Provincial Names of British Birds: Swainson, Charles: : BooksReviews: 1.

Folk-lore & Provincial Names of British Birds Hardcover – January 1, by Rev. Charles. Swainson (Author) out of 5 stars 1 rating. See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Kindle "Please retry" $ — — Hardcover "Please retry" $Reviews: 1.

Provincial names and folk lore of British birds by Charles Swainson,Pub. for the English dialect society by Trübner and co. edition, in EnglishCited by: 3. A Dictionary of English and Folk-Names of British Birds With Their History, Meaning, and First Usage; And the Folk-Lore, Weather-Lore, Legends, Etc.

Relating to. Internet Archive BookReader Provincial names and folk lore of British birds. Provincial Names and Folk Lore of British Birds, Volume 32 Volume 18 of English Dialect Society publications English Dialect Society Provincial Names and Folk Lore of British Birds, English Dialect Society Publication, English Dialect Society Publication:.

Buy The folk lore and provincial names of British birds by Swainson, Charles (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: 2. Buy British Birds: their folklore, names & literature (Their Names, Folklore and Literature) New Ed by Francesca Greenoak (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: 6. birds in Old English), but their sounds are ubiquitous across the Anglo-Saxon landscape – both the literary landscape and the physical one. 3 Another, though more implicit, aspect revealed by these calendar entries is that there is an informative.

The Folklore and Provincial Names of British Birds by Swainson, Charles at - ISBN - ISBN - Kessinger Publishing Co - - Softcover. Buy The Folklore and Provincial Names of British Birds by Charles Swainson from Waterstones today. Click and Collect from your local Waterstones or get FREE UK delivery on orders over £ Genre/Form: Folklore: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Swainson, Charles.

Folk lore and provincial names of British birds. Nendeln/Liechtenstein: Kraus Reprint, Genre/Form: Nomenclature (Popular) Folklore Terminology: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Swainson, Charles.

Provincial names and folk lore of British birds. About this book. British Birds: Names, Facts, Myths explores the intriguing world of the names of British birds. Uniquely the book examines in detail the wide range and meaning of local and common names, the derivation and meaning of the official vernacular English name and thirdly the same analysis of the birds' scientific name.

Pantheon Books, New York. Campbell, J. () Superstitions of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. James MacLehose and Sons, Glasgow. Fleming, M. () Not of this World: Creatures of the Supernatural in Scotland. Mercat Press, Edinburgh. MacGregor, A.

() The Peat-Fire Flame: Folk-tales and Traditions of the Highlands and Islands. A History of British Birds is a natural history book by Thomas Bewick, published in two 1, Land Birds, appeared in Volume 2, Water Birds, appeared in A supplement was published in The text in Land Birds was written by Ralph Beilby, while Bewick took over the text for the second book is admired mainly for the beauty and clarity of Bewick's wood.

A Dictionary of English and Folk-Names of British Birds; With Their History, Meaning, and First Usage, and the Folk-Lore, Weather-Lore, Legends, Etc., Relating to the More Familiar Species by H Kirke Swann,available at Book.

Folklore and myths Could you tell me of any superstitions or English folklore associated with goldfinches please. In the Anglo-Saxon times, Goldfinches were known as Thisteltuige or Thistle-tweaker, due to their fondness of thistles, teasels and knapweeds.

References to birds in literature abound and some these are quoted to make a specific point. The book includes material on British bird species. Enjoy this book as a serendipity of the fascinating meanings of the diverse names given to British birds, intriguing information on their lives and the many tales about them, true and otherwise.

The author of a new book on the history of birds’ names found tales of conquest, myth and human endeavour The yellowhammer’s name comes not from a. Folklore English Books Showing of 66 The Great Smelly, Slobbery, Small-Tooth Dog: A Folktale from Great Britain (Hardcover) by.

Margaret Read MacDonald (Goodreads Author) (shelved 3 times as folklore-english) avg rating — 84 ratings — published Want to Read saving Want to Read. Pages in category "Legendary birds" The following pages are in this category, out of total. This list may not reflect recent changes ().

Biography. Rob Hume is a freelance writer, editor and artist, with more than thirty books on birds to his Still is publishing director of WILDGuides and a prolific natural history Swash is managing director of WILDGuides and a well-known wildlife photographer and Harrop is an award-winning photographer and the owner of the ecotourism business Shetland Wildlife.

A dictionary of English and folk-names of British birds, with their history, meaning, and first usage, and the folk-lore, weather-lore, legends, etc., relating to the more familiar species.

Swann, H. Kirke. British Birds, their Folklore, Names and Literature by Greenoak, F. at Pemberley Books Theme Oxley Nepal Slate Thistle Currency GBP (£) US$ EURO YEN. County Folk-Lore, vol. 2: Examples of Printed Folk-Lore Concerning the North Riding of Yorkshire, York, and the Ainsty.

London: Published for the Folk-Lore Society by David Nutt, Gutch, Eliza, and Mabel Peacock. County Folk-Lore, vol. 5: Examples of Printed Folk-Lore Concerning Lincolnshire. London: Published for the Folk-Lore Society by.

Download RIS citations. TY - BOOK TI - A dictionary of English and folk-names of British birds; with their history, meaning, and first usage, and the folk-lore, weather-lore, legends, etc.

Scientific Name: Turdus merula; Preferred Habitat: Woodlands, gardens, parks; The blackbird is one of the best known of all British birds. It is a familiar visitor to gardens and parks, where it can be seen foraging for food in the grass.

The blackbird’s diet consists of. One harvest time during the chaotic reign of King Stephen, a farmworker in Woolpit, Suffolk, found a pair of children hiding in a pit. They were frightened. They couldn’t speak English and their skin was bright green.

At first they wouldn’t eat anything but raw beans. The boy died. But the girl grew up, got married and learned English. She said they had come from a place called St Martin. : A dictionary of English and folk-names of British birds: With their history, meaning and first usage, and the folk-lore, weather-lore, legends, etc., relating to the more familiar species () by Swann, H.

Kirke and a great selection of similar New, Used and Collectible Books available now at great prices. Click the cover for more details about the book.

Birds: Myth, lore & legend, by Rachel Warren Chadd and Marianne Taylor (Bloomsbury, August ) “draws on historical accounts and scientific literature to reveal how colourful tales or superstitions were shaped by human imagination from each bird’s behaviour or appearance,” states the.

The origin of the odd name ‘dowitcher’ is slightly lost in obscurity, but is most likely from an Iroquoian word for snipe-like birds. There is an Oneida (one of the Iroquois tribes, from north-eastern USA) word for snipe: tawistawe or tawistawis, which is the presumed origin of the Anglicised dowitcher.